Parts of Lanna Traditional Houses

Parts of Lanna Traditional Houses


รุปภาพเพิ่มเติม
Parts of Lanna Traditional Houses

1. Pan-Lom (rake edge)
Pan-Lom deflects the wind from hitting the roofing. These are two thin planks of wood each attached to Pae-Hau-Sao which sits on the top of the pillar. They rest on top of Pae (purlin) and finally meet just on top of Pae-Jong. The top end of the Pan-Lom is often decorated with Ga-lae.

2. Nah-Naeb (gable)
Nah-Naeb is a triangular truss for a pitched roof. It encloses the end of a roof.

3. Din-Koh (clay roofing tiles)
These are made from baked clay. Their thickness is around 0.5 – 1.0 cm. Each tile has a fold down at one end which enables them to stay in place on top of Mai Kan Fah (roof tile battens).

4. Pan-Nam-Yoi (fascia board)
These are Long wooden planks connected to the end of the Gorn (common rafters). Their function is to cover the edge of the roof. Some of the house has been carved similar to eaves laces.

5. Fah-Lai (sliding panels)
These are constructed from 2 layers of wooden panels; each panel is spaced evenly apart. When the inner panel is overlap with the outer panel they create vents on the wall. They are generally constructed on the walls where the occupants need to look outside or where an air-flow in needed.

Parts of Lanna Traditional Houses

1. Ga-lae
Thin wooden carvings which protrude out from the top of the gable. Ga-lae extends Pan-Lom (rake edge) to forms a cross-shape at the top of Pae-Jong (ridge board).

2. Hum-Yon (lintel)
Hum-Yon is a decorative lintel made from wood, often with intricate patterns of a wood carving or stenciled. It is believed to protect the occupants in the room from bad omens and warding off bad spirits.


3. Tern (veranda)
This is the area which is connected to the front Shan but one step higher. Tern is primarily a working and resting area. A wooden wall often with a door separate tern with the bedroom. Daytime activities include weaving and welcoming the guest.

4. Shan (terrace)
An open space on the front and also at the rear part of the house from the staircase. The front Shan area just off from Tern is used for drying things such as clothes, bedding and also food and vegetables. Shan in the rear part of the house connects to the kitchen and used as a washing area.

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Lanna Traditional House Museum
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Close on bank holidays
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